Preventing Tomato Frost Damage

Growing tomatoes are the most sought out vegetable for a home gardener. There is something special about trying to produce the best growing tomatoes possible and eating the ripe fruit straight out of the garden – particularly the cherry or grape variety! Nothing compares to the taste of a tomato that has ripened on the vine. It is important to protect and save these sun loving tomato plants during a frost.

The perfect temperature range for a tomato plant is 64 – 75 degrees, and no lower than 55 degrees. If it gets too cold, you might see curling of the leaves, the tomatoes may show scarring with holes, or the pollination may be poor. A tomato plant will stop producing fruit when the nights turn cold, however, any fruit already on the plant will continue to ripen.

The following three tips on how to save tomato plants during a frost will help you produce the best growing tomatoes attainable:

1) If it has not rained recently, water your plants & then cover them with a thick layer of leaves – the combination of leaves and moist soil protects the roots

2) Placing a “Row Cover” over the plants adds 6 degrees – because this product breaths, you can leave it on the plants for several days (can be found at a hardware store)

3) Spraying “Cloud Cover” over the plants adds 3 degrees (also found at a hardware store)

These are just a few of the ways to save tomato plants during a frost. By taking precautions during times of frost, growing tomatoes can prove to be a fun and greatly satisfying experience!

Deb R. is an avid gardener with a special interest in growing tomato plants. Are you trying to grow the best juicy and tasty tomato possible, and avoid disease, pests, and soil problems? Best Growing Tomatoes [http://www.bestgrowingtomatoes.info]. Check out this fantastic guide on how to grow fabulous tomatoes right now! [http://www.bestgrowingtomatoes.info]

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